Children of Dune by Frank Herbert – 2/5 Stars

Children of Dune by Frank Herbert - front cover

Paul decided to disappear into the desert with his visions of past, present, and future. His empire disappears with him, leaving corruption, vice, and greed in his wake. The ecology of Dune is adapting, and water is plentiful. The old Fremen ways are dying out, and moisture-fat Fremen live in the towns, grown soft with privilege, and fearful of their incompetence to the tyranny.

The third Dune novel focuses on the abnormal children of Paul Muad’ Dib and Chani, who the Bene Gesserit faction fear are both at risk of becoming abominations. As if to give truth to the theory, Paul’s sister Alia is overwhelmed by the tumult of voices from the living consciousness of memory that exists inside her and she becomes tyrant, in thrall to a familiar evil voice from the first Dune book.

There were many scenes and parts I enjoyed in Children of Dune: the children attempting to escape death from the beasts of assassination, the Lady Jessica’s attempted escape from her mad daughter Alia, and Leto II’s rise to prominence.

However, more than half of the story was mired in irrelevant conspiracy, corruption, nostalgia, and uninteresting characters. Children of Dune was a disappointment, for three main reasons:

Firstly, the character focus is off, and what binds the subplots together is the planned assassination of the children of Paul Muad’Dib and Chani. Both of the parents are now dead as characters, and there wasn’t much about either boy Leto or girl Ghanima that made them unique characters. They were lenses into the past characters and events in Dune, the first story. Through the story I had my fill of all-knowing children with many memories of lives stretching back to ancient times. Though the contrast between abomination Alia and the children was meant to be illustrative, the delivery of differences was tiresome, complex, and littered through the text.

Secondly, the book was all about nostalgia: what Paul had said to Chani or his mother Lady Jessica; dead characters returning in new forms; or inflexible Stilgar being Stilgar. It was okay with Duncan Idaho in the second book Dune Messiah because the author added a more developed, if not entirely plausible, idea about his flesh being resurrected and him being given new abilities. As a character Duncan Idaho had changed. There is change in Children of Dune but the emphasis of that change wasn’t interesting enough: about a bureaucracy having grown large and corrupt, no longer recognising the days of die-hard Fremen. I thought we had covered this in Dune Messiah so returning to it and exploring it further made it read like a history of Dune than a great science fiction novel.

Third, these visions have gone too far! As with the many-lives of the children, the intricacies of how the omnipresent visions work go beyond comprehension and into a realm of justified contradiction, and of the nonsensical.

I actually really enjoyed the last third of the book, which did tie some loose ends together and it moved the story forward through immediate action – Leto II’s struggle to escape captors and learn the truth of his purpose on Dune. Nevertheless, I don’t think I’ll read this book a third time.

Children of Dune on Amazon

The Official Dune Website