Inkitt’s Writers Write Program

Ink - photo

To encourage more writers to complete National Novel Writing Month (Nanowrimo), Inkitt are launching a program whereby writers take their ‘pledge’, which is like an acknowledgement by you that by entering the program it’s more likely you will finish your manuscript and that your first draft isn’t going to be perfect – such issues can be fixed at a later stage …

The program includes motivational tips from industry professional writers such as Andy Weir, Lauren Kate, and Gayle Forman. It helps you with getting feedback because they can match you with a writing buddy in a writing community, and there are special tools such as live chat and a public ranking to see how you compare with other writers. Useful, eh? Another valuable tool will likely be the reader demographics, which shows you who your readers are and may help you target them.

 

Is there an end goal?

For every one of you who completes the program, which I assume means 50,000 words in a month, you may write a one-paragraph pitch for entry into a Winners List. I’m assuming this is just for author publicity and not necessarily publication by Inkitt, but it looks like you’ll cross that bridge when you get there.

 

The press release

‘Inkitt launches a free program to help you turn your idea into a novel within 30 days

Have you ever thought about writing a novel? There are millions of people in the world who have ideas floating around in their heads that they want to write down but never find the time.

Inkitt, the world’s first reader-powered book publisher, will be launching their first ‘Writers Write Program’  on November 1st to help you turn your idea into an original novel. The 30-day program is completely free and filled with special benefits such as:

Free, 30 min private sessions with professional writing coaches (including the editor of The Martian)

Events and tips with bestselling authors like Andy Weir, Lauren Kate, and Gayle Forman

A variety of community features such as the choice to get a writing buddy who you can exchange manuscript feedback with

“Our intention is to enlarge the writing community by encouraging more people to become writers,” said CEO of Inkitt, Ali Albazaz. “The program is completely free so for us this isn’t about making money; it’s about encouraging talented and committed writers to keep going and finish what they started.”

If you are serious about taking on the challenge or want to finish (or start!) a manuscript then make sure to get your spot in the program now. There is less than a week left before it starts.’

Inkitt’s Writer’s Write Program

What is copy editing and proofreading?

In a nutshell
  1. Developmental editing is for authors who have an incomplete manuscript, and need help making it complete.
  2. Copy editing is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help making the writing ready to publish by making sure it is correct, consistent, logical, and suitable for intended readers.
  3. Typesetting/formatting is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help preparing it for publication in a specific format.
  4. Proofreading is for authors who have a complete manuscript ready to publish, and need a ‘final check’ for accuracy, inconsistency, error, and presentation of all necessary elements.

There are many different definitions used by editors or proofreaders for the same or similar services involved in book production. For example, sometimes developmental editing is synonymous with substantive editing, structural editing, or manuscript critique. The below are my definitions of the book production process, based on my experience and understanding.

Developmental editing

Developmental editing looks exclusively at the big picture aspects of a story: how the overall narrative works in relation to the structure, characters, plot, dialogue, themes, and concept of the story. It’s intended to make sure that it is as fully ‘developed’ as it needs to be, and can help give you guidance on where to take it from conception to completion. Developmental editors won’t read line-by-line, as with copy editors, but will focus on particular extracts or paragraphs within a given scene or chapter and will offer suggestions for improvement. In this sense, they work at the paragraph-level and not the sentence-level.

There are two main types of developmental editing: ‘substantive editing’ and ‘manuscript critique’. Substantive editing may involve substantial rewriting or restructuring, which can be taken as suggestions by the author. In this way, it is a heavy form of editorial intervention, for authors who may not be confident with their story or writing and could benefit from an expert editor. Some forms of substantive editing have differing levels of intervention. It could go on a scale that places it as a higher form of intervention than ‘line editing’, which looks more at improving the flow of writing at the sentence-level, and ‘copy editing’, which looks more at the technical parts of language than on improving the writing.

There is also a ‘manuscript critique’, which will offer a report in the form of an editorial letter, offering constructive criticism and feedback to guide the author by commenting on their strengths and weaknesses in structure, characters, plot, dialogue, themes, and concept. With this information, the author can then work on the problem areas themselves.

Copy editing

Copy editing involves making sure that the writing style is appropriate for the intended readership, the structure of the publication is logical and complete, and the writer’s message is clear. Some copy editors will offer suggestions on the structure and style of sentences where there is inconsistency, ambiguity, disrupted flow, or where there are issues to be raised.

Copy editors, as with proofreaders, correct and mark-up errors of spelling, grammar, and punctuation, and use a style sheet and checklist to verify that all writing elements are consistent and make sense. However, copy editors are permitted to intervene more than proofreaders because they typically work on an unedited and unrefined version of the author’s manuscript, and there is therefore more scope for changes to be made. In situations where the manuscript requires more intervention, the copy editor will raise queries with the author to verify facts and better understand the author’s intention.

It’s the copy editor’s responsibility to make sure that:

  1. The writing is correct, flows well, makes sense, and is suitable for the intended readership
  2. Stylistic decisions are consistent according to standard conventions or preferred style
  3. Use of language is accurate such as word usage, repetitive or superfluous words, tense, and point of view
  4. The presentation is of the highest quality and consistent, setting the standard for readers’ expectations
  5. The writing of the manuscript is fit for publication and ready for designing, formatting, proofing, printing, and publishing

Copy editors traditionally work on a more incomplete version of the manuscript, before it has been designed and typeset/formatted. Proofreading comes in at a later stage, used as a final check that there are no lingering errors. The term ‘copy editing’ comes from when an editor, traditionally working for a publishing house, would glance at a ‘copy’ (unedited original manuscript) and work on a ‘proof’ (to-be-edited copy) side-by-side.

Proofreading

Proofreading requires marking-up errors of spelling, punctuation, and grammar, using a style sheet and checklist to verify that writing is consistent and makes sense.

Proofreading is a stage that traditionally comes after copy editing, and is used as a ‘final check’ to correct any lingering typographical errors, or even new ones that have been introduced if there have been multiple rounds of editing between editors and the author. Therefore, the proofreader reads for consistency and sense, and only intervenes when there is a discrepancy because they must keep in mind that they are working on a manuscript that is close to a published version and cannot afford to make any unnecessary or costly changes that could have repercussions.

Some of the textual elements a proofreader checks include capitalisation, hyphenation, spelling, style, abbreviations, time and date. Some of the design elements a proofreader checks include page numbers, running headlines, headings, tables, illustrations, captions, references, cross-references, widows and orphans, and footnotes.

  

The Inkitt App Brings Thousands of Novels by Indie Authors to Android

Inkitt empowers readers and publishers to discover world’s next best sellers

BERLIN, JANUARY 7, 2017: Inkitt, the world’s first readers and data-driven book publishing house is introducing an Android app for phones and tablets, globally available from today.

Inkitt’s iOS app became available back in November and was well received by users: The app was not only featured on the US App Store but also on numerous other App Stores around the world, as well as on the front page of Product Hunt, ranking in the top 10 in Tech.

Inkitt for iOS featured as a top Books app in the US App Store

Following the warm welcome by the iOS community, and in order to meet the demand of their own fast growing user base, Inkitt is now bringing their digital library with thousands of novels by emerging authors to Android devices.

“It was a great reward to see Inkitt featured as a top app in numerous App Stores around the world and receive such great feedback from users” says Inkitt’s Founder and CEO, Ali Albazaz. “Readers were really excited about the iOS app but kept asking when we’re launching on Android too. We heard them, worked really hard and today we’re bringing Inkitt to Android devices. All readers will now be able to discover tomorrow’s bestsellers on the go and read great novels by upcoming authors wherever they are.”

Inkitt for Android – 4 key features:

  • Access to thousands of novels from all fiction genres: fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, thriller, horror, romance, drama, action, adventure, YA and more
  • Personalized reading suggestions: hand-picked novels based on a reader’s favorite fiction genres
  • Customizable look to match user preferences (e.g. font size, color combinations)
  • Online/Offline: readers can save novels to their offline library to access them anytime

Inkitt for Android will be available to download on Google Play from the 7th of January 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beyond being a platform connecting aspiring authors with book lovers, Inkitt’s mission is to become the world’s fairest publishing house: Its in-house developed algorithm analyzes reading behavior to determine the potential of a novel to become the next bestseller. Using this unique data-driven approach, Inkitt wants to ensure that great works by new and talented writers never again stay in the dark.

Since July, Inkitt has published 7 novels: Catalyst Moon: Incursion by Lauren L. Garcia (Fantasy), Just Juliet by Charlotte Reagan (YA Romance), I Was A Bitch by Emily Ruben (YA Romance Mystery), Esper Files by Egan Brass (SciFi) and Caged by Onaiza Khan (Psychological Thriller),  King’s Lament by Lilia Blanc (Fantasy Romance) and Three Fat Singletons by J.M. Bartholomew (Humor Romance), six of which became bestsellers on Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………….

About Inkitt

On the surface, Inkitt (www.inkitt.com) is a platform where aspiring writers can share their novels and inquisitive readers can unearth fresh content. But under the hood, we are democratizing publishing: The Inkitt algorithm analyzes reading behavior to predict future bestsellers. In other words: if readers love it, Inkitt publishes it.

MEDIA CONTACT

marvin@inkitt.com

 

Is my story ready to be copy edited?

In a nutshell
  1. Developmental editing is for authors who have an incomplete manuscript, and need help making it complete.
  2. Copy editing is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help making the writing ready to publish by making sure it is correct, consistent, logical, and suitable for intended readers.
  3. Typesetting/formatting is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help preparing it for publication in a specific format.
  4. Proofreading is for authors who have a complete manuscript ready to publish, and need a ‘final check’ for accuracy, inconsistency, error, and presentation of all necessary elements.
Before I hire a professional copy editor

Before you consider hiring a professional, it is helpful for you to read resources about how you can self-edit your story, to improve it to the best of your ability in terms of writing, characterisation, plot, overall narrative, and structure. A self-edit is not a substitute for hiring a professional editor, but it can help make sure your story is in the best shape possible; which will make the process easier for you and the editor, and is more likely to help improve the quality. Ultimately, time spent on self-editing your story will mean less money is spent on your editing, and it’ll be less likely that you’ll need the help of different professionals before publishing.

It’s also recommended before considering hiring an editor to get honest feedback on what trusted friends think of your writing. Join writing groups, online writer communities and forums, or find beta-readers to get an objective view of your story. These book lovers will help you see your story from the point of view of readers and it’s wise to take on board their advice, build on your strengths, and compensate for any weaknesses. It’s not always appealing for writers, at least in my experience as a writer, to listen to what other readers think, but the value of reader’s feedback and an outside perspective should not be underestimated or dismissed if you want to move your writing and your story forward.

When do I hire a professional copy editor?

Once the story is complete, in terms of the structure, plot, and overall concept, then it is time for the author to consider working with a copy editor. Some copy editors prefer the author to have had their story developmentally edited, self-edited, or beta-read before they accept to work on it. However, these are guidelines for new authors rather than strict rules. In practice, most copy editors will request to edit a sample of the story to get a feel for the writing, see how much editing is involved, and assess if it is ready to be edited; as well as such things as how suitable the story is for them to work on and how much the editing will cost.

Do I need copy editing?

There is no obligation for the independent author to hire a copy editor but it is recommended for ‘professional’ authors who are serious about working as a writer for a living, getting positive reviews, and writing for their readership. Many authors decide to work with copy editors based on the advice or feedback they receive from beta-readers or other writing professionals. Publishers use copy editors because they know that their expertise can help ensure that the quality of the story is in line with reader expectations. In this way copy editing acts like a bridge between the author and the reader.

If you only intend to publish for family and friends and you are not concerned what your potential readership thinks of your writing, then it might not be worth investing in a copy editor. Even though many independent authors begin by not writing for a readership, only writing and publishing to prove that they can and to hone their skills, later these same independent authors may easily want to appeal to a particular group of readers or are confident enough to publish professionally.

What is copy editing?

Copy editing involves making sure that the writing style is appropriate for the intended readership, the structure of the publication is logical and complete, and the writer’s message is clear. Some copy editors will offer suggestions on the structure and style of sentences where there is inconsistency, ambiguity, disrupted flow, or where there are issues to be raised.

Copy editors, as with proofreaders, correct and mark-up errors of spelling, grammar, and punctuation, and use a style sheet and checklist to verify that all writing elements are consistent and make sense. However, copy editors are permitted to intervene more than proofreaders because they typically work on an unedited and unrefined version of the author’s manuscript, and there is therefore more scope for changes to be made. In situations where the manuscript requires more intervention, the copy editor will raise queries with the author to verify facts and better understand the author’s intention.

It’s the copy editor’s responsibility to make sure that:
  1. The writing is correct, flows well, makes sense, and is suitable for the intended readership
  2. Stylistic decisions are consistent according to standard conventions or preferred style
  3. Use of language is accurate such as word usage, repetitive or superfluous words, tense, and point of view
  4. The presentation is of the highest quality and consistent, setting the standard for readers’ expectations
  5. The writing of the manuscript is fit for publication and ready for designing, formatting, proofing, printing, and publishing

Copy editors traditionally work on a more incomplete version of the manuscript, before it has been designed and typeset/formatted. Proofreading comes in at a later stage, used as a final check that there are no lingering errors. The term ‘copy editing’ comes from when an editor, traditionally working for a publishing house, would glance at a ‘copy’ (unedited original manuscript) and work on a ‘proof’ (to-be-edited copy) side-by-side.

 

Misery by Stephen King – 5/5 Stars

Misery by Stephen King‘It was the face of a woman who has come momentarily untethered from all of the vital positions and landmarks of her life, a woman who has forgotten not only the memory she was in the process of recounting but memory itself. He had once toured a mental asylum…’

The sheer terror and suspense of Misery left me speechless with shock during the entire reading experience. Bestselling writer Paul Sheldon has a car accident and wakes to find he is crippled. Soon after he realises he has been kidnapped by Annie Wilkes. From their first encounter Paul sees something amiss in Annie Wilkes’ behaviour and believes she is mentally unstable. His legs are broken, being confined to his bed, and he is addicted to the painkillers she feeds him. In his delirious state, she has him in thrall. Indeed Paul soon sees what happens when he contradicts Annie or awakens the ‘Dragon Lady’. What does Annie Wilkes want? Well, she’s the number one fan of his Misery books, and she can’t wait for him to write another one. This new book will be a single-copy special edition, dedicated to her. After all … she did take care of him, rescuing him from his car after the accident, and of course she loves him, right?

Seeing the breadth of the terror Annie embodied and how it affected Paul was one of the most thrilling parts of Misery. Annie’s sadistic nature and sly intellect grow with each part, and you’re left feeling as helpless as poor Paul. Just when you think things can’t get any worse, they do. Throughout, Paul has to tread carefully if he is to keep his life; she’s threatened to kill him on more than one occasion, and he sees it as dangerous to go against her. All the while he is bringing back to life a character he killed at the end of his Misery series, Misery Chastain, in his new novel Misery’s Return.

In many ways Misery is the story of a writer fighting against fears and paralysing impossible situations to come up with new ideas and find the will to write the story you feel like writing, and want to write.

Stephen King’s website

Publisher Inkitt launches new iOS app

Today Inkitt is introducing an iOS app for iPhone and iPad available to readers globally. The iOS app will give book lovers and publishers greater access to Inkitt’s digital library of over 80,000 stories by up-and-coming authors. Key features include:

  • Access to 80,000 stories in every genre: fantasy, sci-fi, romance, thriller, horror, adventure, action and more
  • Personalized suggestions: hand-picked novels based on reader’s preferences
  • App customization according to user preferences (e.g. font size, colors)
  • Online/Offline: readers can save novels to their offline library to access them without an internet connection

Continue reading “Publisher Inkitt launches new iOS app”

On Writing by Stephen King – 5/5 Stars

On Writing by Stephen King

‘When you write a book, you spend day after day scanning and identifying the trees. When you’re done, you have to step back and look at the forest.’ Stephen King.

On Writing is Stephen King’s semi-autobiography and writer’s tips book. For the first 120 pages, Stephen King summarises his writing history, from a small publishing enterprise with his brother when he was young to writing for magazines at university. We get a number of fragmented ‘glimpses’ into his family, jobs he has held, and some of his early writing successes and failures prior to first publication. These ‘glimpses’ showed what made him the writer he became. Stephen King has since battled through family death, drug addiction, and alcoholism. At the end of this agonising road he came to the conclusion that ‘art is a support system for life’ and not the other way around. It’s a quote I intend to keep in mind.

The second half of On Writing provided writing tips to the aspiring writer; tips King has learnt to use to edit his writing and keep readers engaged with his stories. There are even a few examples of editing at the end of the book. Whether it’s the use of adverbs or dialogue attribution, King keeps it simple and relatable, without assuming a profound knowledge of English grammar or creative writing. The tone of the writing wasn’t snobbish at all. In fact, it was a surprise to read about his background. Without knowing any different, I wrongfully assumed the situation once-a-bestselling-author-always-has-been-a-bestselling-author. While reading, I felt like King was teaching me straightforward lessons while having a conversation.

Criticism: I didn’t agree with the following statements: ‘it is impossible to make a competent writer out of a good one’, ‘equally impossible to make a great writer out of a good one’, ‘if you’re a bad writer, no one can help you become a good one, or even a competent one’, and ‘if you’re good and want to be great fuhgeddaboudit’.

A lesson of note was that although King had been writing since a young age, it was his commitment, perseverance, and his willingness to listen to others that made him a successful person and author. On Writing is candid, evocative, and bursting with writer advice coming from experience and hindsight. King delivers with personality and humour. On Writing is more than a book, it’s an experience!

Stephen King’s website

Salem’s Lot by Stephen King – 4/5 Stars

Salem's Lot by Stephen King

Marsten House represents a childhood horror for writer Ben Mears, and he returns to Salem’s Lot to put that horror to rest. Ben doesn’t expect to fall in love with Susan or make friends with teacher Matt, but he is still seen as an outsider and not to be trusted. When a few disappearances occur, it’s natural that the village folk see Ben as the one responsible and he is promptly questioned. It doesn’t help that the subject of his latest story ties him in with the infamous Marsten House.

Purportedly a haunted house story based on Dracula and flesh-eating vampires, Salem’s Lot delivers with an eerie setting and a chilling atmosphere in the first few chapters, with creepy dialogue. There was a lot of planning and research in evidence – an apt background to the unexplained mysteries and horrors of the Marsten House. Stephen King delivered with the right pace, slowing down to add character background or speeding up events to the inevitable discovery … a discovery which the reader suspects but the characters can only fear the supernatural. I thought this part of the narrative was artfully done.

From chapter three it became clear to me that Stephen King likes to delve deeply into the lives and histories of numerous characters. (Salem’s Lot is the first Stephen King book read, so this is new to me.) There were sinister plans in action concerning the renovation of Marsten House, but I did struggle to remember the character names and the respective facts about them, and so could not enjoy Salem’s Lot to the maximum.

SPOILER: I did think the focus of the story switched in a way I was less comfortable with; I wanted to learn about Marsten House and uncover secrets that could link it with vampires but it ended up being more about the latter.

When the focus returned to Ben Mears and the story sped up, I read with relish. The writing had suspense and didn’t need to work hard for my attention. I finished Salem’s Lot not with ‘Ah, isn’t that nice’, but with an equally satisfying ‘I’ve been through some ordeal, and I want to go through it again’.

Stephen King’s website