Where is my Creativity?

Creativity

‘The use of imagination or original ideas to create something; inventiveness.’

Oxford Dictionaries

Internal and external factors

Before delving into my own experiences, let’s look first at how we define creativity. The first things we think of are often, as in the definition above, imagination, ideas, and inventiveness. However, creativity is influenced by many factors, both external and internal. Internal factors may include personality traits such as being open-minded, adventurous, and experimental. External factors include whether you are in the right environment, an environment conducive to creativity, and what resources in terms of ideas, writing, inspiration, or people that are available to you.

Conformity

Creativity can be more prevalent in some people or places than in others. For example, it is often rooted in people or cultures who do not conform. Perhaps it is a wish to explore new avenues of thought and expression, rather than to be told how to think, work, or behave. As a result, it attracts a greater following, and is popular among those who see its value.

Who are creative people?

Some occupations are considered creative while others are not. Writing, music, and art are creative pursuits, but jobs that are considered normal, routine, or that involve tasks that leave little room for group innovation or personal development would not be considered creative. Sometimes there is confusion as to what would constitute creativity. Many writers of fiction wouldn’t think running a business would be creative. For many a business represents the antithesis of their creativity. Yet there are other fiction writers out there; some of whom have had previous backgrounds or relevant knowledge in the working world; embrace creative business practices and actively encourage creativity in their businesses. It may depend on how we define creativity and which type of creativity we enjoy.

Balancing creativity

Have you thought about how much you are using the creative part of your brain, and whether this can suffer if you spend too much time using the other parts of the brain: editing, running a business, etc.? Independent authors sometimes need to be editors and publishers too. Indeed the number of tasks expected of ourselves can be overwhelming. It affects our mindset, and it’s not out of the question to assume it can also affect our creativity.

My experience – author and editor differences

I find, as a copy editor and proofreader, the skills I need are quite different from those I use as an author. It can be confusing when you think of yourself as both, or combine job roles in order to succeed. In 2016 I went to Bradford Literature Festival and I was confronted with the problem, as if my brain was a hat and I could don the author or the editor one at will, and yet without having decided which one to use I was left with no hats on, confused, so to speak. Do I introduce myself as an editor and have business cards ready just in case? Or do I aim to take advantage of opportunities to improve the quality of my own stories and improve my publishing and marketing model? I didn’t know, and attended as an observer. If you consider yourself a professional at anything, you shouldn’t be going to a place where your target audience is only to observe or take a mild interest.

You need to prioritise in life, and that means deciding on a structure, and brain pattern, and sticking with it. Everything else has to be secondary, for a specified time. I chose to prioritise my freelance copy editing and proofreading, and there is a part of my mind that notices how differently I think now: planning, organising, targeting, and analysing. I see things through the lens of efficiency. I plan and research my novels more than I used to and only consider jumping in when all the pieces are in place. Patience and preparing quality become paramount.

When being an indie author was the priority my mindset was less calculating, searching for promotional events and literary opportunities or the next best thing, and making connections with readers, were the most important priorities. Having stalls and holding writing sessions helped too. In my experience, authors seek out approval and they have a real passion for their writing and the inspiration their writing comes from; they have a unique background and world view to share. Writing during this time revolved around my direct experiences of having Asperger Syndrome. The condition was an ideal research topic and this informed the attributes and struggles of my characters. I wrote, and wrote, and wrote, without caring too much about planning or self-editing until I had drafts down. I was moving forward all the time without knowing exactly where I was moving, yet at the same time I was impatient, uninformed, and without having planned sufficiently, but these weaknesses are not necessarily characteristic of most authors.

Prioritising has helped me rectify some of the mistakes of one mindset, and has prevented confusion. As much as we humans want to have the ‘best of both’ it isn’t possible; you’d need two minds, and we can only aim for the ‘best we can’.

Have you noticed any differences between what you consider the creative part of your brain and the non-creative part?

What is copy editing and proofreading?

In a nutshell
  1. Developmental editing is for authors who have an incomplete manuscript, and need help making it complete.
  2. Copy editing is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help making the writing ready to publish by making sure it is correct, consistent, logical, and suitable for intended readers.
  3. Typesetting/formatting is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help preparing it for publication in a specific format.
  4. Proofreading is for authors who have a complete manuscript ready to publish, and need a ‘final check’ for accuracy, inconsistency, error, and presentation of all necessary elements.

There are many different definitions used by editors or proofreaders for the same or similar services involved in book production. For example, sometimes developmental editing is synonymous with substantive editing, structural editing, or manuscript critique. The below are my definitions of the book production process, based on my experience and understanding.

Developmental editing

Developmental editing looks exclusively at the big picture aspects of a story: how the overall narrative works in relation to the structure, characters, plot, dialogue, themes, and concept of the story. It’s intended to make sure that it is as fully ‘developed’ as it needs to be, and can help give you guidance on where to take it from conception to completion. Developmental editors won’t read line-by-line, as with copy editors, but will focus on particular extracts or paragraphs within a given scene or chapter and will offer suggestions for improvement. In this sense, they work at the paragraph-level and not the sentence-level.

There are two main types of developmental editing: ‘substantive editing’ and ‘manuscript critique’. Substantive editing may involve substantial rewriting or restructuring, which can be taken as suggestions by the author. In this way, it is a heavy form of editorial intervention, for authors who may not be confident with their story or writing and could benefit from an expert editor. Some forms of substantive editing have differing levels of intervention. It could go on a scale that places it as a higher form of intervention than ‘line editing’, which looks more at improving the flow of writing at the sentence-level, and ‘copy editing’, which looks more at the technical parts of language than on improving the writing.

There is also a ‘manuscript critique’, which will offer a report in the form of an editorial letter, offering constructive criticism and feedback to guide the author by commenting on their strengths and weaknesses in structure, characters, plot, dialogue, themes, and concept. With this information, the author can then work on the problem areas themselves.

Copy editing

Copy editing involves making sure that the writing style is appropriate for the intended readership, the structure of the publication is logical and complete, and the writer’s message is clear. Some copy editors will offer suggestions on the structure and style of sentences where there is inconsistency, ambiguity, disrupted flow, or where there are issues to be raised.

Copy editors, as with proofreaders, correct and mark-up errors of spelling, grammar, and punctuation, and use a style sheet and checklist to verify that all writing elements are consistent and make sense. However, copy editors are permitted to intervene more than proofreaders because they typically work on an unedited and unrefined version of the author’s manuscript, and there is therefore more scope for changes to be made. In situations where the manuscript requires more intervention, the copy editor will raise queries with the author to verify facts and better understand the author’s intention.

It’s the copy editor’s responsibility to make sure that:

  1. The writing is correct, flows well, makes sense, and is suitable for the intended readership
  2. Stylistic decisions are consistent according to standard conventions or preferred style
  3. Use of language is accurate such as word usage, repetitive or superfluous words, tense, and point of view
  4. The presentation is of the highest quality and consistent, setting the standard for readers’ expectations
  5. The writing of the manuscript is fit for publication and ready for designing, formatting, proofing, printing, and publishing

Copy editors traditionally work on a more incomplete version of the manuscript, before it has been designed and typeset/formatted. Proofreading comes in at a later stage, used as a final check that there are no lingering errors. The term ‘copy editing’ comes from when an editor, traditionally working for a publishing house, would glance at a ‘copy’ (unedited original manuscript) and work on a ‘proof’ (to-be-edited copy) side-by-side.

Proofreading

Proofreading requires marking-up errors of spelling, punctuation, and grammar, using a style sheet and checklist to verify that writing is consistent and makes sense.

Proofreading is a stage that traditionally comes after copy editing, and is used as a ‘final check’ to correct any lingering typographical errors, or even new ones that have been introduced if there have been multiple rounds of editing between editors and the author. Therefore, the proofreader reads for consistency and sense, and only intervenes when there is a discrepancy because they must keep in mind that they are working on a manuscript that is close to a published version and cannot afford to make any unnecessary or costly changes that could have repercussions.

Some of the textual elements a proofreader checks include capitalisation, hyphenation, spelling, style, abbreviations, time and date. Some of the design elements a proofreader checks include page numbers, running headlines, headings, tables, illustrations, captions, references, cross-references, widows and orphans, and footnotes.

  

Is my story ready to be copy edited?

In a nutshell
  1. Developmental editing is for authors who have an incomplete manuscript, and need help making it complete.
  2. Copy editing is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help making the writing ready to publish by making sure it is correct, consistent, logical, and suitable for intended readers.
  3. Typesetting/formatting is for authors who have a complete manuscript, and need help preparing it for publication in a specific format.
  4. Proofreading is for authors who have a complete manuscript ready to publish, and need a ‘final check’ for accuracy, inconsistency, error, and presentation of all necessary elements.
Before I hire a professional copy editor

Before you consider hiring a professional, it is helpful for you to read resources about how you can self-edit your story, to improve it to the best of your ability in terms of writing, characterisation, plot, overall narrative, and structure. A self-edit is not a substitute for hiring a professional editor, but it can help make sure your story is in the best shape possible; which will make the process easier for you and the editor, and is more likely to help improve the quality. Ultimately, time spent on self-editing your story will mean less money is spent on your editing, and it’ll be less likely that you’ll need the help of different professionals before publishing.

It’s also recommended before considering hiring an editor to get honest feedback on what trusted friends think of your writing. Join writing groups, online writer communities and forums, or find beta-readers to get an objective view of your story. These book lovers will help you see your story from the point of view of readers and it’s wise to take on board their advice, build on your strengths, and compensate for any weaknesses. It’s not always appealing for writers, at least in my experience as a writer, to listen to what other readers think, but the value of reader’s feedback and an outside perspective should not be underestimated or dismissed if you want to move your writing and your story forward.

When do I hire a professional copy editor?

Once the story is complete, in terms of the structure, plot, and overall concept, then it is time for the author to consider working with a copy editor. Some copy editors prefer the author to have had their story developmentally edited, self-edited, or beta-read before they accept to work on it. However, these are guidelines for new authors rather than strict rules. In practice, most copy editors will request to edit a sample of the story to get a feel for the writing, see how much editing is involved, and assess if it is ready to be edited; as well as such things as how suitable the story is for them to work on and how much the editing will cost.

Do I need copy editing?

There is no obligation for the independent author to hire a copy editor but it is recommended for ‘professional’ authors who are serious about working as a writer for a living, getting positive reviews, and writing for their readership. Many authors decide to work with copy editors based on the advice or feedback they receive from beta-readers or other writing professionals. Publishers use copy editors because they know that their expertise can help ensure that the quality of the story is in line with reader expectations. In this way copy editing acts like a bridge between the author and the reader.

If you only intend to publish for family and friends and you are not concerned what your potential readership thinks of your writing, then it might not be worth investing in a copy editor. Even though many independent authors begin by not writing for a readership, only writing and publishing to prove that they can and to hone their skills, later these same independent authors may easily want to appeal to a particular group of readers or are confident enough to publish professionally.

What is copy editing?

Copy editing involves making sure that the writing style is appropriate for the intended readership, the structure of the publication is logical and complete, and the writer’s message is clear. Some copy editors will offer suggestions on the structure and style of sentences where there is inconsistency, ambiguity, disrupted flow, or where there are issues to be raised.

Copy editors, as with proofreaders, correct and mark-up errors of spelling, grammar, and punctuation, and use a style sheet and checklist to verify that all writing elements are consistent and make sense. However, copy editors are permitted to intervene more than proofreaders because they typically work on an unedited and unrefined version of the author’s manuscript, and there is therefore more scope for changes to be made. In situations where the manuscript requires more intervention, the copy editor will raise queries with the author to verify facts and better understand the author’s intention.

It’s the copy editor’s responsibility to make sure that:
  1. The writing is correct, flows well, makes sense, and is suitable for the intended readership
  2. Stylistic decisions are consistent according to standard conventions or preferred style
  3. Use of language is accurate such as word usage, repetitive or superfluous words, tense, and point of view
  4. The presentation is of the highest quality and consistent, setting the standard for readers’ expectations
  5. The writing of the manuscript is fit for publication and ready for designing, formatting, proofing, printing, and publishing

Copy editors traditionally work on a more incomplete version of the manuscript, before it has been designed and typeset/formatted. Proofreading comes in at a later stage, used as a final check that there are no lingering errors. The term ‘copy editing’ comes from when an editor, traditionally working for a publishing house, would glance at a ‘copy’ (unedited original manuscript) and work on a ‘proof’ (to-be-edited copy) side-by-side.